Sunday, August 12, 2018

Premiata Forneria Marconi (PFM) - 1975-11-23 - Tokyo, Japan

Premiata Forneria Marconi (PFM)
1975-11-23
Shibuya Kokaido, Tokyo, Japan 

Soundboard recording, very good quality
Available in both Lossless (FLAC) and Mp3 (320 kbps) versions

Here's more from PFM, an Italian prog rock band that made a splash in the '70's, featuring melodic and instrumental richness, sumptuous compositions and arrangements. This show features the band just a little more than a year later than the previous post, and although they play many of the same songs, there is a fundamental difference in the band, as they had now added a new lead vocalist, Bernardo Lanzetti, which brought a more forceful and dynamic presence to their vocals from this point on, and was first featured on their album Chocolate Kings (1975).

Tracklist:
1. Celebration
2. Four Holes In The Ground
3. Paper Charms
4. Dove...Quando...
5. Acoustic Guitar Solo
6. Out of Roundabout
7. Mr. 9 'Till 5
8. Alta Loma 5 'Till 9
9. Violin Solo
10. Bass Solo
11. Drum Solo
12. Impression Di Septembre
13. Celebration (reprise)
Bonus Track: 1975-11-29 - Nakano Sun Plaza, Tokyo (Audience)
14. Chocolate Kings

Flavio Premoli - keyboards, accordian, piccolo
Mauro Pagani - flute, violin
Franco Mussida - guitars
Patrick Djivas - bass
Franz Di Cioccio - drums, vocals
Bernardo Lanzetti - Lead vocals, guitar

FLAC - PFM_1975-11-23_Tokyo_FLAC.rar


mp3 - PFM_1975-11-23_Tokyo_mp3.rar

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Premiata Forneria Marconi (PFM) - 1974-08-27 - Ultrasonic Studios, Hempstead, NY

Premiata Forneria Marconi (PFM)
1974-08-27
Ultrasonic Studios, Hempstead, NY 

FM Broadcast recording, very good quality
Available in both Lossless (FLAC) and Mp3 versions

Progressive rock has often been associated primarily with England and British bands (yes, virtually all of the most famous and successful prog bands are British), but actually there are great progressive rock bands from all over, especially throughout europe. One of the most interesting of the european progressive bands was Premiata Forneria Marconi (PFM) (translation:Award-winning Marconi Bakery), the most successful prog band from Italy. PFM was formed in 1970 in Milan, when members of the previous band I Queli joined up with violinist-flutist Mauro Pagani. They were the first Italian band to feature a synthesizer. Their first album (released only in Italy) was Storia di minuto (1972), which was an immediate success, quickly followed by Per un Amico (1972) which expanded their influence outside Italy and across europe. Around this time, while on tour in Italy, Greg Lake (of Emerson, Lake, and Palmer) heard them, and immediately signed them to their new label, Manticore records. Because of this connection, their next album, Photos of Ghosts (1973) was released worldwide (with mostly re-recorded versions of songs from their previous albums), and for the first time featured lyrics in English (in an attempt to reach a wider audience). Interestingly, instead of just translating their Italian lyrics to English, all new English lyrics were written, by King Crimson-ELP cohort Pete Sinfield. The album charted in countries all around the world, including the US. They followed this success with another Italian album (L'isola di niente) followed by an English version, The World Became the World (1974), and then their first U.S. tour. Concerts recorded from this tour became the basis for a Live album, Cook (1975).  The band also reached their largest US audience when they appeared on the TV show The Midnight Special in early 1975. For their next album, Chocolate Kings (1975), they added a new lead vocalist, Bernardo Lanzetti, and a harder rock sound. Jet Lag (1977) was their last album with English lyrics (as well as last album released in the U.S.) and moved more towards a jazz fusion sound. They continued performing and releasing albums in Italy for many more years, but never achieved International success after that. Because of their association with ELP, some (who never really listened to them) dismissed the band as Italian ELP imitators, but that does not do them or their music any justice. They had their own unique sound and were much more diverse in style and instrumentation. They were both uniquely Italian while developing traditional prog influences, producing a lyrical, romantic and delicate music, with a great melodic and instrumental richness, sumptuous compositions and arrangements. They deserve a place among the  very best of the '70's prog bands. Here is a show from their 1974 U.S. tour, as they established themselves as a progressive force to be reckoned with.

Tracklist:
1. Four Holes In The Ground (7:41)
2. Is My Face On Straight? (7:53)
3. Instrumental jam (8:58)
4. Dove...Quando... (4:39)
5. introduction (1:32)
6. Mr. 9 'Till 5 (4:25)
7. Alta Loma 5 'Till 9 (11:06)
8. JC violin jam (2:30) (cut - some issues)
9. classic violin solo (3:25)
10. William Tell Overture (1:51)
11. Celebration (5:34)

Flavio Premoli - keyboards, vocals
Mauro Pagani - flute, violin, vocals
Franco Mussida - guitars, vocals
Patrick Djivas - bass
Franz Di Cioccio - drums, vocals

FLAC - PFM_1974-08-27_Ultrasonic_NY_FLAC.rar

mp3 - PFM_1974-08-27_Ultrasonic_NY_mp3.rar

Sunday, July 15, 2018

Nektar - 1977-10-18 - Hofstra University, New York, NY

Nektar
1977-10-18
Hofstra University, New York, NY

FM broadcast (WLIR) recording, very good quality
Available in both Lossless (FLAC) and Mp3 (320 kbps) versions

Here's more from Nektar, from a couple years later, on their tour promoting their current album, Magic is a Child (1977). However, this was after founding member, guitarist, and lead vocalist, Roye Albrighton, had left the band, and was replaced by Dave Nelson. Because of this, Nektar purists tend to look down on this album and period for the band. This was their first release for Polydor, and it did have a somewhat more slick production, and perhaps a bit more mainstream rock sound (even with bits of power pop thrown in), but still with plenty of progressiveness and eclectic charms, resulting in what I think is just a great rock album. Personally, I think it is one of Nektar's very best, my favorite of theirs, and one of the best of that era. Yes, the sound is a bit different, especially with Nelson instead of Albrighton as lead vocalist, but it is a wonderful album, nonetheless. Naysayers should give it another chance (with open ears). Anyway, So, I was thrilled to find this FM broadcast recording of a show from this tour, featuring many of the songs from Magic is a Child, including 'Spread Your Wings', which is just an all-time great straight-up Rocker. Good sound on this recording, although it seems to run a bit fast (either that or they just played these songs very fast in concert), as they all are faster here than on record. Anyway, great show. Unfortunately, this "new" version of Nektar didn't catch on, and the band split-up in 1978, but with original members Freeman and Albrighton re-forming another "new" version of the band (with new bass and drums) in 1979, although that incarnation was short-lived as well. But then, much later, in 2000, as seems to happen with these progressive rock bands from the Seventies, Freeman and Albrighton re-formed the band yet again, (now with Ray Hardwick on drums), and eventually with Moore returning on bass and Larry Fast also joining in on some subsequent albums and tours. Later, Ron Howden also returned (on drums), and the band continued (with various lineup changes, Albrighton being the only constant throughout) over the next several years, right up until Albrighton's death in 2016. So, Nektar did live on for many years after their '70's heyday. Check out the 1977 version of the band here.

Tracklist:
01. Midnight Lite
02. Train From Nowhere
03. Remember The Future Part 2
04. Remember The Future Part 2 (continued)
05. Away From Asgard
06. King Of Twilight
07. Magic Is A Child
08. Recycled
09. Eerie Lackawanna
10. Oh Willy / Mr. H.
11. On The Run
12. Spread Your Wings

Allan "Taff" Freeman - Keyboards, synthesizers, backing vocals
Derek "Mo" Moore - Bass, backing vocals
Ron Howden - Drums, percussion, backing vocals
Dave Nelson - Guitars, lead vocals
Mick Brockett - Special effects

FLAC - Nektar_1977-10-18_New York_FLAC.rar

Mp3 - Nektar_1977-10-18_New York_mp3.rar

Thursday, July 5, 2018

Nektar - 1975-04-02 - Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis, MO

Nektar
1975-04-02
Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis, MO

Soundboard recording, very good quality
Available in both Lossless (FLAC) and Mp3 (320 kbps) versions

Next up on the tour is another under-appreciated progressive rock band, Nektar. Nektar is an English band, but was formed in 1969 in Hamburg, Germany (by musicians playing the German club circuit in different bands) featuring  Roye Albrighton (guitar, vocals), Allan "Taff" Freeman (keyboards),  Derek "Mo" Moore (bass), and Ron Howden (Drums). Initially their sound  followed in the psychedelic/space-rock tradition of Pink Floyd, but with a bit heavier rock style, and influences from the current German scene as well. The visual style and effects of their shows were very much a feature of the band, so much so that their "visual effects" guy was considered an actual member of the band. Each album featured a somewhat different, or developing sound and style, thus "progressing" through their history. Their first album, Journey to the Center of the Eye (1971) was a sci-fi concept album consisting of one continuous song. By their 2nd album, A Tab in the Ocean (1972), their unique progressive rock style was solidifying (less psychedelic,more progressive) into a satisfying blend, and their following was increasing (primarily by word of mouth). The band continued to experiment with a largely improvised double live-in-the-studio third album, Sounds Like This (1973), quickly followed by the elaborate concept album Remember The Future (1973), which featured 2 multi-part songs and a more melodic rock style, and became their breakthrough album (and most critically acclaimed), especially in the US, where it quite surprisingly rose to #19 on the Billboard Charts. In 1974, they released Down to Earth, another concept album with a circus theme that also did well (with their only charting single, "Astral Man". Their next album, Recycled (1975) featured an environmental concept theme, and also featured the addition of heavier synthesizer work from emerging electronic music whiz Larry Fast (Synergy) for additional layers to their sound. However, by the end of 1976, guitarist Albrighton left the band, to be replaced by Dave Nelson, and their next album, Magic is A Child (1977), featured a slicker, melodic (more commercial?) rock sound (but still with plenty of progressive sparks and twists). But by 1978, the band split, only for Albrighton and Freeman to re-form the band in 1979 (with different bass and drummer) for the release of Man in the Moon (1980), before dissolving again in 1982. I really like Nektar and their ever-changing progressive styles (even as they became more mainstream), and they certainly deserve a revered place in Progressive rock history, but they seem little remembered these days. Unfortunately, there are not many good quality live recordings available from the prime years of Nektar (and most of the really good ones have been commercially released). But here is a great-sounding show from early 1975 (unfortunately woefully incomplete, cuts out after ~45 min), that mostly features previews (early versions) of some new songs from their still yet to be recorded 1975 album, Recycled, and their recent album, Down to Earth, but doesn't include anything from Remember the Future. Thus, I have added as bonus tracks some pieces of Remember The Future (as well as "Good Day" from Sounds Like This), from a 1974 show (but unfortunately, I only have these bonus tracks in lower-res mp3, no FLAC. note - If anybody has this show in FLAC, would love to get it). Anyway, check out the prog-rock classic Nektar. 


Tracklist:
01. Astral Man
02. Recycled
03. A Day In The Life Of A Preacher
04. Show Me The Way
05. Marvelous Moses (Cut-Fades out)

Bonus Tracks:
1974-05-30 - Musikhalle, Minden, Germany
(Audience recording, very good quality - only available as mp3 [240 kbps])
06. Remember The Future (Part1)
07. Good Day
08. Remember The Future (Part2)

Roye Albrighton - Guitars, lead vocals
Allan "Taff" Freeman - Keyboards, synthesizers, backing vocals
Derek "Mo" Moore - Bass, backing vocals
Ron Howden - Drums, percussion, backing vocals
Mick Brockett - Special effects

FLAC - Nektar_1975-04-02_St.Louis_FLAC.rar

mp3 - Nektar_1975-04-02_St.Louis_mp3.rar

Sunday, June 24, 2018

Camel - 1979-09-22 - Golders Green Hippodrome, London, UK

Camel
1977-09-22
Golders Green Hippodrome, London, UK
"Moon Dance"

FM Broadcast (BBC Sight and Sound) recording, excellent quality
Available in both Lossless (FLAC) and mp3 (320 kbps) versions

Here's more from Camel, from a couple years later, following their albums Moonmadness (1976) and Rain Dances (1977). Thus, this show reflects the lineup change after Moonmadness, with Richard Sinclair (of Caravan) replacing Doug Ferguson on bass, and Mel Collins (King Crimson, Kokomo) on sax and winds, and marked the beginning of a bit jazzier direction for the band. A fine show, primarily featuring songs from Rain Dances, in very good quality from a BBC broadcast. The version I received of this show contained a couple of bonus tracks from a later date, si I included these as well. These are from a 1980 show in Japan, by which time there were additional lineup changes and a move toward a more commercial sound

Tracklist:
1. First Light            5:01
2. Metrognome        4:56
3. Uneven Song        5:56
4. Rhyader-Rhyader Goes to Town 7:20
5. Skylines               5:22
6. Highways of the Sun 5:15
7. Lunar Sea            8:53
8. Rain Dances-Never Let Go 6:33
9. One of These Days I'll Have an Easy Night 7:01

Bonus Tracks (Tokyo - 1980-01-27)
10. Echoes        7:24
11. Nobody Knows    6:22

Andrew Latimer - guitar, vocals
Andy Ward - drums, perscussion
Peter Bardens - keyboards
Richard Sinclair - bass, vocals
Mel Collins - sax, clarinet, flute
(except bonus tracks - Dave Sinclair, Jan Schelhaus-keyboards, Richard Schelhaus - bass)

FLAC - Camel_1977-09-22_London_FLAC.rar

mp3 - Camel_1977-09-22_London_mp3.rar

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Camel - 1975-12-18 - Reading, UK - PRRP-051 - "The Last Flight"

Camel
December 18, 1975
Reading Town Hall, Reading, UK
PRRP-051 - "The Last Flight"

Remastered audience recording (PRRP-051), very good quality
Available in both Lossless (FLAC) and Mp3 (320 kbps) versions

Moving on with my featured Progressive Rock bands, next up is Camel. Camel plays a form of progressive rock that incorporates many influences, from jazz, classical, Baroque, blues, and electronic music. Their sound has been favorably compared with bands such as Genesis and King Crimson, however, their style tends to be calmer, more atmospheric and melodic than most other progressive bands. Although they never quite achieved more than a dedicated cult following, most progressive fans now consider their first four albums to be essential prog listening and among the classics of the era. Camel was formed in 1971 in the Guildford, Surrey region of England, featuring Andy Latimer (guitar), Andy Ward (drums), Doug Ferguson (bass), and Pete Bardens (keyboards). Their debut LP, Camel (1973), however, garnered little attention, and they were dropped by MCA. Switching over to Deram, their 2nd album, Mirage (1974), garnered much critical acclaim, but still only limited sales and recognition, although it was initially more appreciated in the U.S. than England (it now is listed among the Top 25 Progressive Rock Albums of all-time, according to rankings by Rolling Stone Magazine). Their next album, an orchestrated all-instrumental concept album, The Snow Goose (1975), was the breakthrough album that brought them somewhat wider attention and success. They followed that with Moonmadness (1976), also acclaimed, but which was their last album to feature their original lineup, as bassist Doug Ferguson left and was replaced with ex-Caravan bassist Richard Sinclair, and Mel Collins (ex-King Crimson, Kokomo) was added on saxophone. The first album to feature this new line-up was Rain Dances (1977) which introduced a somewhat different sound and overall style to their music. After another album (Breathless-1978), keyboardist Bardens also left, but the band continued through the early 80's before breaking up, but then re-forming in the '90's and continuing on from there. However, most agree that those first 4 albums were by far the best of the band. Here is a show from 1975, which features the full Snow Goose show bookended by a few songs from earlier albums, for a wonderful show. This is the PRRP (Progressive Rock Remasters Project) remaster and has very good sound. This was also billed as the very last performance of the full Snow Goose show (Thus titled "The Last Flight").


Tracklist:
01 The White Rider
02 Supertwister
03 Introduction to the Snow Goose
04 The Great Marsh
05 Rhayader
06 Rhayader Goes to Town
07 Sanctuary
08 Fritha
09 The Snow Goose
10 Migration
11 Rhayader Alone
12 Flight of the Snow Goose
13 Preparation
14 Dunkirk
15 Epitaph
16 Fritha Alone
17 La Princesse Purdue
18 The Great Marsh (reprise)
19 Homage to the God of Light
20 Lady Fantasy

Pete Bardens - keyboards
Doug Ferguson - bass
Andy Latimer - guitars, flute & vocals
Andy Ward - drums, percussion

FLAC - Camel_1975-12-18_Reading_PRRP051_FLAC.rar

mp3 - Camel_1975-12-18_Reading_PRRP051_mp3.rar

Monday, June 11, 2018

National Health - 1978-03-10 - Bordeaux, France

National Health
March 10th, 1978
BĂ©ret Cosmique, 
Bordeaux, France

Audience Master recording (by Erathostene), very good quality
Available in both Lossless (FLAC) and Mp3 (320 kbps) versions

Here's more from National Health, a couple years later, at a 1978 show, featuring songs from their 2nd album, Of Queues and Cures (1978), and more of their whimsically eclectic jazz/rock, with Phil Miller and Dave Stewart still there, but with Alan Gowen now gone (temporarily) and Pip Pyle on drums. Gowen would return after this tour (but then Stewart left) and continue until 1981, when Gowen died. After that, Stewart returned to do a final album with the band, D.S. Al Coda (1982), which featured primarily previously unreleased songs written by Gowen, as a tribute and finale for the band.  

Tracklist:
disc1
1-1. Also Sprach Zarathustra/The Bryden 2-Step (18:12)
1-2. The Lethargy Shuffle (11:40)
1-3. A Legend In His Own Lunchtime (12:02)
1-4. DS Improv/ The Collapso (7:21)
disc2
2-1. Dreams Wide Awake (12:33)
2-2. Mostly Twins and Trios (12:16)
2-3. Tenemos Roads (12:31)
2-4. Improv/ Elephants (18:50)
Total time : 01:46:38

Phil Miller - Guitar & Backing Vocals
Dave Stewart - Keyboards
John Greaves - Bass & Lead Vocals
Pip Pyle - Drums

FLAC - National Health_1978-03-10_Bordeaix_FLAC.rar

mp3 - National Health_1978-03-10_Bordeaix_mp3.rar